Computer Science: Science

1CRITERIA DIMENSION ONE 
(Centrality to Mission/Validation Context)

Context:
Describe why and when the program was created.
(150-word limit)

  The B.S. degree in Computer Science was first offered by the Mathematics Department in 1974. Since 1979, it has been offered by the Computer Science Department, which was formed with faculty from Mathematics, three of whom are still members. Many Computer Science departments were founded in the 1970s, following the 1950s in which computers were first commercially available and the 1960s in which computers began to change
industry and the economy. California has been and continues to be a world leader in research, manufacturing and application of computing technology. The program's primary mission has been and continues to be teaching Californians and other students the foundational computer science theory and software engineering skills needed to contribute to and lead countless industries that produce or rely on computers and software.
 

Comment:
The purpose of this question is to establish the history and context of the program-its original goal and/or focus.  We are interested in the evolution of the nature and character of the program.


Criterion 1.1: Internal and external demand for the program:      
Demand for a program will be recognized at different levels.  In some cases a program’s demand may be represented by the trend in the number of applicants each year or while other program’s demand may be better represented by recognizing courses taught as service or general education for the larger University population.


Indicator 1.1.1
Number of students enrolled in the program:

Fall 00 Fall 01 Fall 02 Fall 03 Fall 05
1,216.00 957.00 763.00 743.00 540.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

Comment:
It is recognized that some programs categorize students according to major while other programs categorize students by options. Double majors do not constitute a significant number of students.


Indicator 1.1.2
External Demand- Total number of applications each year for the program: 

First time Students Fall     

00 01 02 03 05
  1,026.00   315.00   598.00   763.00   499.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

First-time Students Winter

01 02 03 04 06
  1.00   (empty)   (empty)   2.00   2.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

First-time Students Spring

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   2.00   1.00   1.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Fall

00 01 02 03 05
  304.00   236.00   227.00   293.00   164.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Winter

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   30.00   34.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Spring

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   (empty)

(Value provided by the Administration)   

Comment:
These data may be used to understand the overall external demand for a program.


Indicator 1.1.3
Annual admits to the program:

First-time Students Fall    

00 01 02 03 05
  792.00   233.00   153.00   254.00   355.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

First-time Students Winter              

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   2.00   2.00

(Value provided by the Administration)    

First-time Students Spring

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   1.00   1.00   (empty)

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Fall

00 01 02 03 05
  165.00   81.00   77.00   129.00   113.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Winter

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   15.00   20.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Spring

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   12.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

Comment:
These data may be used to understand the show rate of students accepted/enrolled.


Indicator 1.1.4
New student enrollments in program:

First-time Students Fall    

00 01 02 03 05
  352.00   70.00   84.00   182.00   109.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

First-time Students Winter              

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   2.00   4.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

First-time Students Spring              

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   1.00   1.00   0.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Fall             

00 01 02 03 05
  120.00   57.00   57.00   97.00   45.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Winter

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   14.00   19.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Spring

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   1.00   (empty)   12.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

Comment:
These data may be used to establish how effective a program is in enrolling perspective students. Low numbers could be used as a justification for additional resources. 


Indicator 1.1.5
List the degree options and the number of students in each. (Fall 2005)

No degree options available for this program.

(Value provided by the Administration)


Indicator 1.1.6
Internal Demand: (Fall 2005)

FTE taught in General Education
(empty)

FTE taught in Service Courses
17.07

Total FTE Taught By Program
189.72

Comment:
Please note that service courses are defined as those courses consisting of 50% or more students outside the major. These data may be used to support a program’s internal demand as an integral part of the University Mission.

(Optional) If appropriate, please comment on the internal demand data
(100-word limit)

 


Indicator 1.1.7
Describe the profile of incoming students:  (Fall 2005)

First-time Student GPA

  3.14   3.12

Mean/Median GPA (Value provided by the Administration)

First-time Student SAT scores

  1,043.00   (empty)   (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25th and 75 th percentile scores (Value provided by the Administration)

First-time Student ACT scores

  3.00   (empty)   (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25 th and 75 th percentile scores (Value provided by the Administration)

First-time Student GRE scores

  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25 th and 75 th percentile scores (Value provided by the Administration)

First-time Student Gender
Male                         Female

95.00 % 5.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

First–time Student Ethnicity

Black, non-Hispanic 5.00 %
American Indian/Alaskan Native 0.00 %
Asian/Pacific Islander 40.00 %
Hispanic 28.00 %
White, non-Hispanic 22.00 %
Nonresident alien (empty) %
Race/ethnicity unknown 5.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student GPA

  3.03   2.99

Mean/Median GPA (Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student SAT scores

  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25th and 75 th percentile scores (Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student ACT scores

  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25th and 75 th percentile scores (Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student GRE scores

  (empty)    (empty)    (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25% and 75% 25th and 75 th percentile (Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student Gender
Male                         Female

93.00 % 7.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student Ethnicity

Black, non-Hispanic 0.00 %
American Indian/Alaskan Native 0.00 %
Asian/Pacific Islander 36.00 %
Hispanic 23.00 %
White, non-Hispanic 32.00 %
Nonresident alien (empty) %
Race/ethnicity unknown 9.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Comment:
These data are intended to provide information about both the diversity and excellence of students in the program. 

(Optional) If appropriate, please comment on the external demand data
(100-word limit)

 


Criterion 1.2: Essentiality of the Program:

Indicator 1.2.1
How does this program contribute to meeting the educational needs of the campus, region, and/or state?
(200-word limit)  

  There has been and continues to be significant demand for highly-trained computer scientists in Southern California (e.g. in defense, aerospace, and entertainment) and throughout the state, especially in Silicon Valley. Computer scientists provide essential and growing support to almost every industry, e.g. as software engineers, system and network administrators, database administrators, application developers, and in
support and service roles. At Cal Poly Pomona, the number of staff jobs requiring computer science skills has mushroomed in the last decade. Students and graduates of our program work in dozens of departments throughout the campus, and have helped to build much of the campus' computing infrastructure. In April 2006, CNN/Money magazine published its survey of the best jobs in America, and named Software Engineer the number one job. The reasons cited included opportunities for extraordinary creativity, high salaries, and a job market predicted to
expand more rapidly over the next ten years than any other job category surveyed.
 

Comment:
Please consider the fundamental knowledge and skills, what makes the program unique, and/or how it addresses employment or market needs.


 Criterion 1.3: Support of the polytechnic mission of the university and support for campus-wide programs and priorities      

Indicator 1.3.1
Describe how the program promotes “learn by doing” activities. Give evidence and examples of how these activities are embedded in the program curriculum.
(150-word limit)

  "Learn by doing" activities are not merely embedded in the Computer Science program; students build software in almost every CS course. Theory and practice are inseparable, since it is practically impossible to engineer good software, especially on a large scale, without a mastery of discrete mathematics and logic. Software accomplishes its magic by manipulating sub-microscopic bits of information in memory billions of times a second. These computations cannot be seen by human eyes, so students can only learn to design programs by thinking abstractly and visualizing the invisible. There has never been a multiple choice or true/false exam in a Computer Science course; no Scantron forms have ever been used. Students demonstrate that they have acquired the foundational knowledge by "doing"--solving problems and designing software solutions.  

Indicator 1.3.2:
List Service Learning Courses and the communities or organizations that have been affected (See University definition of designated Service Learning Courses) (04-05)

The Computer Science program does not currently include any designated Service Learning Courses.  

Comment: 
In light of the Cal Poly Pomona mission to link theory and practice, please outline how this program integrates this goal. List or describe service learning courses.

Indicator 1.3.3
Describe how the program supports campus-wide priorities/initiatives such as Teacher Preparation, Honors Program, Life Long Learning and Interdisciplinary teaching.
(150-word limit)

The Computer Science program does not currently include any designated Teacher Preparation. We offer CS400/461/462/490 Honors courses. Several students participate in the Honors program (three of which gave poster presentations at the CoS Research Symposium, May 2006).

A few faculty have co-taught interdisciplinary courses (e.g. in bioinformatics). With respect to Life Long Learning, one of the axioms of software engineering is that tools and techniques evolve rapidly. Tools used now will differ from those
used in five or ten years; however, an essential body of underlying theory prevails for a much longer time. Students at vocational training institutes are taught tool trivia without much theory. Our students learn principles that persist across generations of tools; they are life-long learners.
 


2 CRITERIA DIMENSION TWO
(Quality/Outcomes)

Criterion 2.1: Learning assurance       
This section informs the Prioritization and Recovery Planning Committee of the program’s achievements in supporting the university goals to promote, enhance and/or improve: teaching, learning, and educational programs; research, scholarly, professional, and creative activities; support for students; the campus environment; and, to increase community involvement.

The information adds to a better understanding of the relationship of department activities to the success of the university in meeting its mission.

Indicator 2.1.1
Number of full-time & part-time faculty serving the program:  (Fall 05)

Number of full-time faculty
11.83

FTE lecturers
1.07

Please include changes or trends that may be relevant to these data.  Also describe policies and practices for role of lecturers that may be relevant to the discipline or market conditions.
(150-word limit)

 

Indicator 2.1.2
Percentage of FTE instruction provided by tenure and tenure track faculty in the upper division/ graduate courses in the major: (Fall 05)

Tenure/Tenure Track (Upper division courses)
100.00 %

Lecturer (Upper division courses)
(empty) %

Tenure/Tenure Track (Graduate, Professional, Credential courses)
(empty) %

Lecturer (Graduate, Professional, Credential courses)
(empty) %

Please include changes or trends that may be relevant to these data.  Also describe policies and practices for
(150-word limit)

 

Indicator 2.1.3
Student-faculty ratio in the program: (Fall 05)
20.90 To 1

Comment:
It is recognized that some faculty members serve multiple programs. The Dean will assist programs in establishing the ratio.

Indicator 2.1.4
Major/Faculty (Serialized Faculty) Ratio: (Fall 05)
48.60 To 1

Comment:
It is recognized that some faculty members serve multiple majors.  The Dean will assist programs in establishing the ratio.

Indicator 2.1.5
Average class size: (Fall 05)

  Lecture Lab Activity Supervisory
Remedial (empty) (empty) (empty) (empty)
Lower Division 28.71 (empty) (empty) (empty)
Upper Division 26.57 (empty) (empty) 3.80
Graduate (empty) (empty) (empty) (empty)

Please provide comments about specific class sizes that may be related to accreditation or space limitations.
(100-word limit)

 

Indicator 2.1.6
Describe the status of student learning outcome assessment programs.  
(150-word limit)

Our program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, which requires a vigorous assessment of learning outcomes. Our assessment program has been in place for several years and we are doing an exemplary job. We have identified witness courses which support Program Outcomes. For each witness course, we have Learning Outcomes, and we collect material each quarter in order to observe how well we have met each Learning Outcome. We hold a yearly meeting for each course in order to evaluate the currency of Learning Outcomes and in order to share ideas for making the course more effective. These yearly meetings close the loop to improve courses based on prior instances. Additional input comes from interviews with alumni and industrial visitors.  

Comment:
Describe whether you are developing a plan, implementing a plan, evaluating data, or using data to affect the program.

Indicator 2.1.7
Describe how the program’s curriculum or teaching pedagogy has changed as a result of internal or external assessment. 
(200-word limit)

Industrial feedback led to (1) requiring that students learn two languages before graduation; (2) the creation of a software engineering lab for use in team projects. Similarly, courses in applications (networking and games) have been introduced with a concomitant de-emphasis on theory. Internal assessment has led us to discuss our courses on a regular basis. This has led to greater use of writing components in programming homeworks, and to more consistent treatment of social and ethical considerations.  

Comment:
You may include interactions with stakeholders, advisory boards, etc.


Criterion 2.2: Preparation of students for a diverse/global community 
Indicator 2.2.1
Describe courses/experiences related to global and/or diversity issues that are available to students.
(150-word limit)           

Students in the Computer Science program study global, ethical and diversity issues in many classes; it is an important requirement in earning and keeping our ABET accreditation. Computing technology is having a profound effect on society, industry and individuals. For example, ubiquitous global networking creates instantaneous communication and has accelerated the economy, but raises concerns about privacy, piracy, free speech and much more. Relational database theory is driving the consolidation of once disparate databases into what effectively is becoming one global database, through which a tremendous (and alarming) breadth of related information can be efficiently mined. Application of cryptographic techniques gives a practical level of privacy, but is also being increasingly used to restrict rights to digital information and protect monopoly markets. Our well-established assessment process identifies specific courses and projects in which students study important global and ethical issues.

Comment:
These could be on or off campus experiences international travel etc. 

Indicator 2.2.2
Diversity of the Faculty:

Male (Fall 05)
76.00 %

Female (Fall 05)
24.00 %

Black, non-Hispanic (Fall 05)
(empty) %

American Indian/Alaskan Native (Fall 05)
(empty) %

Asian/Pacific Islander (Fall 05)
59.00 %

Hispanic (Fall 05)
(empty) %

White, non-Hispanic (Fall 05)
41.00 %

Nonresident alien (Fall 05)
(empty) %

Race/ethnicity unknown (Fall 05)
(empty) %

Please describe policies and practices or current efforts to address the diversity of the faculty serving the program.
(150-word limit)

We recruit proactively, leveraging personal contacts that our faculty have with other universities. We advertise in forums that will attract the widest audience, and we work closely with the campus diversity officer to enrich the candidate pool. For many years we have had a very diverse faculty by several criteria. For example, we have a greater proportion (over 25%) of women on our faculty than the national Ph.D. production rate (18%), our longest serving department chair was disabled, and our faculty roster represents many nations. These factors
in turn help us attract a diverse pool of applicants, and faculty candidates are encouraged by the role models they see when they visit the campus, allowing us to sustain faculty diversity over the years.
 


Criterion 2.3: Faculty research and creative activity

Indicator 2.3.1
List faculty peer reviewed publications and creative activities: (Years 03-04, 04-05, 05-06)

Department wide

Sent Separately.

Comment:
This information should be available in the annual report.

Indicator 2.3.2
Describe any resources available for professional travel excluding resources made available by the College Dean, Faculty Center, Research and Graduate Studies, or President’s travel funds. (Years 03-04, 04-05, 05-06)
(150-word limit)

Professional travel funds have been made available to faculty members through departmental accounts during all the stated time-periods. Funding levels have typically matched other forms of support (such as the President's travel funds). The Computer Science Department is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). An accreditation indicator is that faculty remain current in their respective discipline. Consequently, faculty members travel to conferences and seminars funded through internal and external grants, stipends, and/or self-funded.  

Indicator 2.3.3
Describe policies, practices and resources for encouraging professional, scholarly and creative activities.
(150-word limit) 

Internally, the department administers a policy whereby faculty members supervise students in the master's program and earn release-time credit. The Dean's Office makes available release time for curriculum development as well as for external grant submissions. The Faculty Center for Professional Development offers a number of programs targeted at faculty members wishing to improve their teaching abilities and achieving their own professional goals--including faculty learning communities and mentor programs. Faculty members have been active and successful utilizing the Faculty Development Advisory Committee's (FDAC) mini-grant program that supports faculty development goals that enhance the educational mission of Cal Poly, Pomona. Presidential travel funds are made available to faculty members to attend conferences. Externally, Dr. Salam Salloum and Dr. Daisy Sang lead the NASA PAIR (Partnership
Awards for Integration of Research) project (Deep Space Exploration Using Smart Robotic Rovers). The effort integrates NASA-related research into the undergraduate Computer Science curriculum.
 


Criterion 2.4: Quality of student advising       

Indicator 2.4.1
Describe policies and practices for academic advising within the program.                      
(150-word limit)

Sent Separately.

Indicator 2.4.2
Graduation rates: by gender and ethnicity:

Values for indicator 2.4.2, graduation rates by gender and ethnicity, are empty for all programs. Graduation rates for first-time freshmen and transfer students are provided for undergraduate programs only. These data were omitted from the reports because it was not feasible to assemble them from existing systems at this time, due primarily to conversion/cross-over issues between Banner and PeopleSoft.

First time freshman 6-year graduation rate

48.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Ethnicity

Black, non-Hispanic (empty) %
American Indian/Alaskan Native (empty) %
Asian/Pacific Islander (empty) %
Hispanic (empty) %
White, non-Hispanic (empty) %
Nonresident alien (empty) %
Race/ethnicity unknown (empty) %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student 3-year graduation rate

33.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Ethnicity

Black, non-Hispanic (empty) %
American Indian/Alaskan Native (empty) %
Asian/Pacific Islander (empty) %
Hispanic (empty) %
White, non-Hispanic (empty) %
Nonresident alien (empty) %
Race/ethnicity unknown (empty) %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Indicator 2.4.3
Number and percentage of Students “At Risk”:

Fall 00 Fall 01 Fall 02 Fall 03 Fall 05
323.00 26.56% 261.00 27.27% 205.00 26.87% 231.00 31.09%   153.00 28.33%

(Value provided by the Administration)

Describe any policies or procedures related specifically to at-risk students (150-word limit)

 

Comment:
Below 2.2 Cal Poly Pomona GPA for undergraduates and below 3.0 GPA for graduates

Indicator 2.4.4
Number of degrees granted:

00 01 02 03 05
124.00 123.00 144.00 157.00 110.00

(Value provided by the Administration)

Indicator 2.4.5
Describe current opportunities for students to apply knowledge in the program through; internships, summer programs, research opportunities, co-op, part-time jobs relating to university course work, teaching associates, etc. (150-word limit)

To gain real-world experience prior to graduation, students are
encouraged to participate in the cooperative education program,
internships, and industrial partnership programs. Under CS professor guidance, the co-op program helps students obtain paid work in his/her major while earning credit. The NASA Partnership Awards for Integration of Research project integrates NASA research into the undergraduate curriculum. Students have the opportunity to earn credit working team projects of moderate size. The JPL Student Independent Research Intern program is an unpaid internship offered twice per year. The McNair Research Internship prepares students for doctoral study and careers in college teaching. Faculty have research projects that students can work on as a special-topics course. Faculty-supervised paid positions are offered to undergraduate and graduate students--listed through the Career Center's online job listings (MonsterTRAK) (this resource also lists co-op, internship, summer, and full-time positions). When
resources permit, students are hired as graders. The Women's Equity Education Act (WEEA) mentoring program offers research opportunities for Women CS students (four of which participated in 2005-2006).
 

Indicator 2.4.6
Describe current structures/processes provided by the program to facilitate student job placement. (150-word limit)

Our industry advisory board meets annually so the department can keep abreast of industry trends. One trend is that some employers give preference to students who have internship experiences. Select employers will not hire a graduating student for a full-time position without an internship at the hiring company. Through advising, the department encourages students to participate in these internships. From its
website, the Computer Science Department offers the "Computer Science Job Resource Center." This resource allows faculty, employers, and alumni to post jobs, internships, and any other related opportunities for Computer Science majors. Additionally, students are counseled to participate in the Career Center's on-campus recruiting program (InterviewTRAK). This program is an Internet-based program that allows
students to sign up for and interview with employers during fall, winter, and spring terms. Most jobs are for full-time graduating students although some jobs are for internships and summer positions.
 


Criterion 2.5: Contribution to the sense of community and the intellectual quality of the campus

Indicator 2.5.1
Describe the current co-curricular and extra activities for students supported by the program (i.e.: clubs, social events, performances.)
(150-word limit)

The program supports the Computer Science Society (CSS), an
OSL-registered club and chartered chapter of the Association of
Computing Machinery (ACM). Dr. Craig Rich is faculty liaison.

Fall 2005
Eight CSS Weekly Meetings
CSS Fall Programming Contest
ACM Regional Programming Contest
TV Taping Fund Raiser
Students presented at engineering symposiums at Cal Poly, Pomona (2003-2006)
Students presented at the 2006 Science Symposium

Winter 2006
Nine CSS Weekly Meetings
Orange County Food Bank Participation
International CES Conference 2006 in Las Vegas, NV
CSS Bowling Night
CSS Barbeque
Linux Installation Festival
CSS Winter Programming Competition
JPL Visit

Spring 2006
Eight CSS Weekly Meetings
ACM Undergraduate Regional Conference, San Diego, CA
CSS Picnic with the faculty
CSS Spring Programming Competition
Take your Advisor to Lunch
City of Pomona Computer Project
Club Shirt Distribution

Indicator 2.5.2
List speakers, symposia, workshops, etc. provided by the program over the past year. 

Spring 2003/2004

The CS Department participated in organizing The 2004 and 2005 LA County and State Science Olympiad (Dr. Salam Salloum served as organizer and judge of the event) called Robot Ramble.


Fall 2005

"Welcome to Computer Science", Dr. Mandayam Srinivas
"Garbage Collection Algorithms, REU at Harvey Mudd College",
Darren Strash
"Open-Source Software Development", David Trotz
"Dreamworks Internship", Margarita Galabova
"Dissecting Pretty Good Privacy (PGP)", Dr. Craig A. Rich
"MIDI synthesis using computers", Earl Yoo

Winter 2006

"Career Fair Workshop", Sharon Mathis-Curd
"Running Your Own Software Company", Ramesh Sabeti

Spring 2006
"Working at Parasoft", Tim Ngo, Alex Escalante & Marek Pilch
"What's Up With AJAX", Dr. Craig A. Rich
"The iRoom Project: a Test Bed for Dynamic, Data-Driven Modeling",
Dr. Phyllis Nelson, Dr. Christopher A. Landauer, Joseph Adam
"What It Takes to Graduate", Pam Hester
"Information Security", Dr. Debra A. Brum, Dr. Dan Manson
 


3 CRITERIA DIMENSION THREE
(Efficiency)

Criterion 3.1: Utilization of physical space            

Indicator 3.1.1
Describe the general space needs of the program and current utilization of space excluding temporary relocations:
(200-word limit each field)
                                                                                                                   
Instructional Space (Classrooms/Labs)

Three classrooms are used in almost all time modules. Additionally, our program uses three lab spaces. Room 8-52 (the PC Lab) houses 35 single-seat stations, each equipped with a PC and internet access. Room 8-51 (the Software Engineering lab) houses 9 four-seat stations for group projects. These two labs are frequently used for classes (closed labs); when not so used, they serve as open labs where students can use
the computers and/or network connections to do their homework via learn-by-doing. Room 3-2636 (the Special Projects Lab, to be completed in 2008) has seats for 35 students with laptops. Additionally, it has space for custom computer networks. This lab will be used both as a classroom and for research.
 

Non-instructional Space

We have a 64-node Linux cluster (supercomputer) in the Collocation Area of the CLA Building--this equipment is used for research only. Room 3-2636 (the Special Projects Lab, to be completed in 2008) has seats for 35 students with laptops. Additionally, it has space for custom computer networks. This lab will be used both as a classroom and for research.  

Comment:
The PRPC is interested in understanding the approximate amount of space that is currently used to run the program.  Are the spaces shared spaces that may be used by other programs throughout the day, week or quarter.  Does the program utilize dedicated space that is used by the program exclusively by one program or class and is not open to other programs due to scheduling, unique equipment or security requirements? Do programs share non-instructional spaces? Do tenure/tenure track faculty members share office space?


Criterion 3.2: Utilization of human resources           

Indicator 3.2.1
Percent of total FTE taught by full-time vs. part-time faculty:

Percent of total undergraduate FTES by part-time (Fall 05)
14.06 %

Percent of total graduate FTES by part-time (Fall 05)
(empty) %

Percent of total undergraduate FTES by full-time (Fall 05)
85.94 %

Percent of total graduate FTES by full-time (Fall 05)
(empty) %

Comment:
The PRPC is interested in looking at how much of an individual program’s curriculum is being taught by full-time and part-time faculty.  The committee does not have a bias about whether a high ratio of one or the other is preferred or if a balance is ideal.  The intent of the ratio is to provide a context within which the committee can make comparisons.

(Optional) If appropriate, comment on the average FTE taught. 100-word limit

 

Indicator 3.2.2
List the number and nature of administrative support staff dedicated to the program.

Number: 1.21
Nature: Receptionist, scheduler, budget, and misc clerical/admin activities.

Comment:
The PRPC recognizes that the number of administrative staff is not necessarily established by a program, nor is the number of support staff necessarily an indicator of the quality of a program.  The committee is interested in looking at the number of staff (i.e. Administrative Coordinator) that may be directly assigned to a program.  If a staff person is shared between programs estimate the amount or ratio as a percentage of the assignment of the staff person to the program based on FTES. 

Indicator 3.2.3
Number of technical and instructional support staff.
1.97

Comment:
The PRPC recognizes that technical and instructional staff members are often shared between programs within a department or a college. Estimate the amount or ratio as a percentage of the assignment of the staff person to the program based on FTES in the individual programs supported. 

(Optional) If appropriate, comment on the administrative structure of your staff. 100-word limit

 


Criterion 3.3: Utilization of technology           

Indicator 3.3.1
Describe the use of computer technology to enhance course delivery and/or course administration.(150-word limit)

The CS Department is on the cutting edge of using information technology in course delivery. We were the first department to switch from slow serial connections on campus through the mid-1990s, using internet-connected labs and classrooms years before I&IT began providing them, and the first department to have web servers and web browsers on campus. Seven years ago, we equipped three classrooms with computer projectors, and we provided departmental laptops for instructor use. I&IT now provides multimedia podiums in two of our regular classrooms.
Lottery funds were used to provide wireless access points to the University's network, several years before wireless access was generally available on campus. All faculty now have laptop computers for use in instructional preparation and course delivery. Faculty members have individual and course web pages to enhance communication with their classes. Several of the faculty use Blackboard regularly. Many faculty collect student homework via email.
 

Comment:
The PRPC is interested in how technology is being utilized by the program.  This use includes regular in-class presentation technologies and course administration (i.e. Blackboard, WebCT, or similar) as well as on-line materials and communications. 


Criterion 3.4: Utilization of time 

Indicator 3.4.1
Describe the current use of alternative scheduling (i.e. evenings, weekends, school breaks and summer) to facilitate or improve student academic progress. (150-word limit)

We offer many courses in the summer in order to facilitate student
completion of the program. These include both lower-division and
upper-division courses. These courses are taught by tenure-track
faculty--not by lecturers.
 


Criterion 3.5: Management of financial resources   

Indicator 3.5.1
Program teaching cost: (Year 05-06)

Cost per WTU
$ 2,586.00

Cost per FTES
$ 2,017.00

Comment:
The PRPC recognizes that this cost changes over time depending on the number of students and the faculty members teaching in the program.  There is no target value rather the value serves as context.

Indicator 3.5.2
Current total operating expenditures: (Year 05-06)
$ 18,275.00

Indicator 3.5.3
External funding generated: (Year, 04-05)

Cash Gifts
$ 3,377.00

Gifts in Kind
$ 9,113.00

Annual Fund
$ 4,849.00

Comment:
The PRPC is interested in understanding how well supported a program may be by ongoing fundraising efforts at the program, College or University levels. 

Indicator 3.5.4
Other revenues generated by the program per Serialized Tenured and Tenure Track faculty.

Grant and Contract Activity

02-03 03-04 04-05
$ 24,431.00 $ 13,575.00 $ 74,526.00

Indirect Cost Recovery for Fiscal Year

02-03 03-04 04-05
$ 4,886.00 $ 2,027.00 $ 15,284.00

Open University

03-04 04-05 05-06
$ 4,813.00 $ 4,228.00 $ 2,249.00

Comment:
Include in this area research grants that sponsor research activities and or release time.  Also include sponsored classes and revenue generated through continuing education or Open University classes that is reimbursed to the program.

(Optional) If appropriate, comment on the resource indicators above.
(150-word limit)

 


4 CRITERIA DIMENSION FOUR
(Opportunity Analysis of the Program)

Criterion 4.1: Opportunities for growth or enhancement in meeting the University Mission

Indicator 4.1.1
Describe how and in priority order areas you would change your program to greater enhance or facilitate the University Mission if your program’s resources were increased permanently.

  • Faculty
  • Staff
  • Equipment
  • Recruiting
  • Operating Budget
  • Facilities
  • Other

(300-word limit)

* Half-time Unix system administrator (needs for the entire CoS actually justify a full-time position). With the intranet on its last leg, the department needs a Unix administrator to be able to run a small Unix cluster to host programming applications needed for most of our courses. The technician can also help with the administration of the anticipated 128 node cluster used by computational and experimental scientists in three departments in college of science.

* Provide opportunities and funding for undergraduates to assist in course delivery and evaluation as T.A.s.

* Two faculty positions to support growth in the areas of game programming, computer graphics and animation, computer architecture and organization which support significant commercial industries in Southern California and are attractive to current and prospective students.

* Provide policies and planning for funding the computer laboratory refresh. It is recognized that "wet" labs in other Science disciplines require ongoing funds for consumable resources. However, departments with computer labs struggle to equip them, even though they are effectively "consumable", requiring regular upgrade and replacement.

* Provide funding for support of undergraduate student research.

* Provide resources for recruiting new students into the program, interacting with the alumni and for maintaining an active industry advisory board.

 

Comment:
For each program, briefly describe what you would do if you had a permanent increase in state funding and why. For example, it could be that hiring more serialized faculty is the most pressing need to meet and sustain the demands of growth and insure student success. Perhaps new laboratory equipment and lab assistance is needed to replace outdated equipment, maintain quality and keep the curriculum relevant. Faculty travel, release time for a vital department need, or any other use of funds could be part of your proposal.