Manufacturing Engr: Engineering

1CRITERIA DIMENSION ONE 
(Centrality to Mission/Validation Context)

Context:
Describe why and when the program was created.
(150-word limit)

  The Manufacturing Engineering (MFE) program was officially started in 1979 to meet the demand in the region for engineers who understood manufacturing processes. The MFE faculty were formerly the Engineering Services Department which taught service courses such as engineering graphics (a.k.a. drafting) and manufacturing processes for the College of Engineering. The emphasis and strength of the program was in metal related processes such as machining, casting, forming, forging, as well as assembly and automation. The program was accredited by ABET in 1988 as the sixth accredited MFE program in the country and the first in the state. The program has been re-accredited every six years. The MFE faculty were also responsible for many years for teaching core courses for Engineering Technology majors in the Manufacturing option. The new MFE program and the existing IE program were merged by the College in 1979 to form the existing IME Department. *  

Comment:
The purpose of this question is to establish the history and context of the program-its original goal and/or focus.  We are interested in the evolution of the nature and character of the program.


Criterion 1.1: Internal and external demand for the program:      
Demand for a program will be recognized at different levels.  In some cases a program’s demand may be represented by the trend in the number of applicants each year or while other program’s demand may be better represented by recognizing courses taught as service or general education for the larger University population.


Indicator 1.1.1
Number of students enrolled in the program:

Fall 00 Fall 01 Fall 02 Fall 03 Fall 05
50.00 56.00 61.00 59.00 75.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

Comment:
It is recognized that some programs categorize students according to major while other programs categorize students by options. Double majors do not constitute a significant number of students.


Indicator 1.1.2
External Demand- Total number of applications each year for the program: 

First time Students Fall     

00 01 02 03 05
  7.00   12.00   13.00   11.00   10.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

First-time Students Winter

01 02 03 04 06
  2.00   1.00   1.00   (empty)   (empty)

(Value provided by the Administration)   

First-time Students Spring

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   1.00   (empty)   (empty)   (empty)

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Fall

00 01 02 03 05
  5.00   6.00   8.00   2.00   9.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Winter

01 02 03 04 06
  4.00   3.00   4.00   3.00   3.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Spring

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   (empty)

(Value provided by the Administration)   

Comment:
These data may be used to understand the overall external demand for a program.


Indicator 1.1.3
Annual admits to the program:

First-time Students Fall    

00 01 02 03 05
  4.00   9.00   7.00   3.00   8.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

First-time Students Winter              

01 02 03 04 06
  1.00   1.00   1.00   (empty)   (empty)

(Value provided by the Administration)    

First-time Students Spring

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   (empty)

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Fall

00 01 02 03 05
  2.00   5.00   6.00   1.00   9.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Winter

01 02 03 04 06
  4.00   (empty)   2.00   1.00   1.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Spring

01 02 03 04 06
  1.00   (empty)   1.00   (empty)   2.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

Comment:
These data may be used to understand the show rate of students accepted/enrolled.


Indicator 1.1.4
New student enrollments in program:

First-time Students Fall    

00 01 02 03 05
  3.00   8.00   6.00   1.00   5.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

First-time Students Winter              

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   1.00   1.00   (empty)   0.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

First-time Students Spring              

01 02 03 04 06
  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   0.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Fall             

00 01 02 03 05
  2.00   2.00   4.00   1.00   6.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Winter

01 02 03 04 06
  4.00   (empty)   2.00   1.00   1.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

New Transfers Spring

01 02 03 04 06
  1.00   (empty)   (empty)   (empty)   3.00

(Value provided by the Administration)   

Comment:
These data may be used to establish how effective a program is in enrolling perspective students. Low numbers could be used as a justification for additional resources. 


Indicator 1.1.5
List the degree options and the number of students in each. (Fall 2005)

No degree options available for this program.

(Value provided by the Administration)


Indicator 1.1.6
Internal Demand: (Fall 2005)

FTE taught in General Education
44.53

FTE taught in Service Courses
0.00

Total FTE Taught By Program
72.53

Comment:
Please note that service courses are defined as those courses consisting of 50% or more students outside the major. These data may be used to support a program’s internal demand as an integral part of the University Mission.

(Optional) If appropriate, please comment on the internal demand data
(100-word limit)

  The Manufacturing Engineering program has a very large positive influx of students who change their major from other engineering disciplines. This is a traditional source of students and is expected to increase with the increase in enrollment in the Mechanical Engineering program.

For example, in Fall 2005 in our IME 112 Introduction to IME course we had 51 students:

24 Industrial Engineering (IE)
22 Manufacturing Engineering (MFE)
5 Other majors (pending Change of Major)

Of the 22 MFE students:

55% were Change of majors (3/4 were from Mechanical Engineering)
32% were tranfer students
14% were first-time-freshmen

These percentages are not atypical. In a sample of 349 IME students enrolled from 1992-2000, 40% were change of majors.


Indicator 1.1.7
Describe the profile of incoming students:  (Fall 2005)

First-time Student GPA

  3.17   3.02

Mean/Median GPA (Value provided by the Administration)

First-time Student SAT scores

  990.00   (empty)   (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25th and 75 th percentile scores (Value provided by the Administration)

First-time Student ACT scores

  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25 th and 75 th percentile scores (Value provided by the Administration)

First-time Student GRE scores

  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25 th and 75 th percentile scores (Value provided by the Administration)

First-time Student Gender
Male                         Female

100.00 % 0.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

First–time Student Ethnicity

Black, non-Hispanic 0.00 %
American Indian/Alaskan Native 0.00 %
Asian/Pacific Islander 40.00 %
Hispanic 60.00 %
White, non-Hispanic 0.00 %
Nonresident alien (empty) %
Race/ethnicity unknown 0.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student GPA

  2.86   2.91

Mean/Median GPA (Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student SAT scores

  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25th and 75 th percentile scores (Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student ACT scores

  (empty)   (empty)   (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25th and 75 th percentile scores (Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student GRE scores

  (empty)    (empty)    (empty)

(Total Math and Verbal) Mean score/25% and 75% 25th and 75 th percentile (Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student Gender
Male                         Female

83.00 % 17.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student Ethnicity

Black, non-Hispanic 0.00 %
American Indian/Alaskan Native 0.00 %
Asian/Pacific Islander 0.00 %
Hispanic 50.00 %
White, non-Hispanic 50.00 %
Nonresident alien (empty) %
Race/ethnicity unknown 0.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Comment:
These data are intended to provide information about both the diversity and excellence of students in the program. 

(Optional) If appropriate, please comment on the external demand data
(100-word limit)

  As mentioned, change of major students make up a significant portion of students in the program. Many underrepresented groups are served by the program.


Criterion 1.2: Essentiality of the Program:

Indicator 1.2.1
How does this program contribute to meeting the educational needs of the campus, region, and/or state?
(200-word limit)  

  The MFE program provides engineers with specialized knowledge of manufacturing processes for many industries in the state and region. Common job titles include Manufacturing Engineer, Process Engineer, Tooling Engineer, and Quality Engineer. All are in great demand with low tech manufacturing moving out of the region and high tech manufacturing expanding (e.g., Computer Integrated Manufacturing). The aerospace, furniture, plastics, machining, forging, and other manufacturing related industries hire manufacturing engineers from Cal Poly Pomona. There is a shortage of graduating engineers who understand these specialized processes. An excellent example of filling a critical need is our foundry. We have the largest undergraduate foundry in the Western US. Local foundries depend on us to provide engineers who understand this field and we have strong ties in the industry. On campus, the MFE program teaches manufacturing related services courses for Mechanical, Industrial, and Engineering Technology majors. These courses include MFE 201 Manufacturing Processes and MFE 126 Engineering Design Graphics. The MFE program maintains laboratories that provide hands-on learning experiences in foundry, removal, forming, welding, CNC, and plastics as well as computer aided drafting and design.*  

Comment:
Please consider the fundamental knowledge and skills, what makes the program unique, and/or how it addresses employment or market needs.


 Criterion 1.3: Support of the polytechnic mission of the university and support for campus-wide programs and priorities      

Indicator 1.3.1
Describe how the program promotes “learn by doing” activities. Give evidence and examples of how these activities are embedded in the program curriculum.
(150-word limit)

  We practice learn-by-doing through projects and labs in most of our courses. Moreover, activities are mostly performed in teams. The senior project is the place where students demonstrate their proficiency at designing a system and take into account multiple constraints. By using real industrial problems for projects, students are forced to face a variety of economic, environmental, social, safety and manufacturability constraints. Also, student clubs and chapters are very much involved in national competitions and conferences and stress leadership skills. Courses that include extensive lab work are: Manufacturing Processes (MFE 217/L, 221/L, and 230/L), Foundry Process Engineering (MFE 334/L). Courses that include extensive application of computer software are: Engineering Graphics (MFE 126/L and 226/L). Courses that apply CNC programming, robotics, and computer interfacing are: Computer-Aided-Design/Manufacturing (MFE 375/L, 450/L, and 476/L) and CNC Machining (MFE 250/L). Facilities Planning (IME 331), Statistical Quality Control (IME 415) and Systems Simulation (IE 429) also incorporate team projects. *  

Indicator 1.3.2:
List Service Learning Courses and the communities or organizations that have been affected (See University definition of designated Service Learning Courses) (04-05)

The Manufacturing Engineering program has not taught any official service learning courses, but has a 20 year history of service learning projects in such classes as IME 331 Facilities Planning and Layout. Many team and senior projects over the years have been completed for schools, cities, and non-profit organizations.*  

Comment: 
In light of the Cal Poly Pomona mission to link theory and practice, please outline how this program integrates this goal. List or describe service learning courses.

Indicator 1.3.3
Describe how the program supports campus-wide priorities/initiatives such as Teacher Preparation, Honors Program, Life Long Learning and Interdisciplinary teaching.
(150-word limit)

Lifelong learning is a major published objective of the IE program. ¿Evidence of the appreciation for lifelong learning¿ is an ABET requirement. Students are encouraged in numerous courses to become registered professional engineers after graduation. They are also exposed to the requirements to become a Certified Quality Engineer or Certified Manufacturing Engineer. Industrial Advisory Council members are frequent guest speakers and reinforce membership in professional organizations and continuation in school. A requirement for our capstone project is a reflective piece which includes the student¿s plan for continued learning based on their project experience. Graduate surveys indicate that a large percentage of students are pursuing graduate work and are active professionally. Interdisciplinary experiences are increasing in the curriculum. EGR 402 Ethical Decision Making is team taught by a philosophy professor and an engineering professor. Reflective pieces by students show that ethics really ties together many of the GE course they have taken. *  


2 CRITERIA DIMENSION TWO
(Quality/Outcomes)

Criterion 2.1: Learning assurance       
This section informs the Prioritization and Recovery Planning Committee of the program’s achievements in supporting the university goals to promote, enhance and/or improve: teaching, learning, and educational programs; research, scholarly, professional, and creative activities; support for students; the campus environment; and, to increase community involvement.

The information adds to a better understanding of the relationship of department activities to the success of the university in meeting its mission.

Indicator 2.1.1
Number of full-time & part-time faculty serving the program:  (Fall 05)

Number of full-time faculty
4.00

FTE lecturers
3.00

Please include changes or trends that may be relevant to these data.  Also describe policies and practices for role of lecturers that may be relevant to the discipline or market conditions.
(150-word limit)

IME Department currently has seven full-time tenured faculty (including the chair), one full-time lecturer, and one half-time FERP that teach between all three programs. In addition we have five part-time lecturers used for undergraduate programs only. In MFE there are approximately four Full Time Equivalent Faculty devoted to the program, which includes teaching several service courses for the College of Engineering that are in large demand (MFE 126 & MFE 201). While enrollment has been steady for many years with strong indications of an increasing trend, we have lost faculty to retirement that have not been replaced. This has added a heavy burden on the remaining faculty for advising, class size, coordinating the graduate program, and advising senior projects. Lecturers are used to teach EGR 402 Ethical Considerations, and EGR 403 Asset Allocation. These courses are suitable for instruction by experienced engineering practitioners. *  

Indicator 2.1.2
Percentage of FTE instruction provided by tenure and tenure track faculty in the upper division/ graduate courses in the major: (Fall 05)

Tenure/Tenure Track (Upper division courses)
100.00 %

Lecturer (Upper division courses)
0.00 %

Tenure/Tenure Track (Graduate, Professional, Credential courses)
0.00 %

Lecturer (Graduate, Professional, Credential courses)
0.00 %

Please include changes or trends that may be relevant to these data.  Also describe policies and practices for
(150-word limit)

MFE instruction in upper division core courses has been delivered primarily by tenured, tenure track, or full-time lecturer faculty. Our current full-time lecturer is an accomplished professional, has served as Chair of the General Education Committee, and is a George P. Hard Award Recipient. Occasionally, manufacturing process electives are taught by part-time lecturers who are professionals currently working in the field. A notable example is MFE 380 which has been taught in recent years by a person whose full-time career is high level management of that function in industry. This practice is an advantage to our students and will have to increase if anyone else retires. Part-time lecturers are used along-side regular faculty to teach our GE synthesis courses EGR 402 and EGR 403 where current practice in engineering is a plus. Our practice has been to use part-time lecturers primarily for lower division courses. Part-time lecturers are chosen for their knowledge, professionalism, teaching ability, and diversity. *  

Indicator 2.1.3
Student-faculty ratio in the program: (Fall 05)
26.00 To 1

Comment:
It is recognized that some faculty members serve multiple programs. The Dean will assist programs in establishing the ratio.

Indicator 2.1.4
Major/Faculty (Serialized Faculty) Ratio: (Fall 05)
182.20 To 1

Comment:
It is recognized that some faculty members serve multiple majors.  The Dean will assist programs in establishing the ratio.

Indicator 2.1.5
Average class size: (Fall 05)

  Lecture Lab Activity Supervisory
Remedial 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Lower Division 33.44 27.36 0.00 0.00
Upper Division 33.33 18.00 0.00 0.00
Graduate 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

Please provide comments about specific class sizes that may be related to accreditation or space limitations.
(100-word limit)

ABET accreditation requires classes to be of a manageable size and adequately supported so that outcomes assessment can demonstrate learning and continuous improvement. As we do not have teaching assistants in our classes, this means that the class sizes need to be appropriate for single instructor effectiveness. ABET also encourages individual faculty offices under the assumption that advising and scholarly work would be more effective.*  

Indicator 2.1.6
Describe the status of student learning outcome assessment programs.  
(150-word limit)

Outcomes assessment is major component of the IE program as exhibited in the self studies submitted for ABET accreditation in 1999 and 2005. A fully functional outcomes assessment system is in place and operating effectively. The IE program has a published mission statement, graduate outcomes and alumni objectives developed in conjunction with stakeholders. Objectives and outcomes are reviewed periodically. All courses are subject to outcomes assessment surveys measuring seven areas (knowledge, problem solving, employability, engineering skills, professionalism/ethics, communication skills, and teamwork) besides the traditional instructional assessment survey commonly used. The capstone project is evaluated using industry professionals to critique the formal presentation. Also, a subject-matter exam is administered to juniors to measure retention and the development of abilities needed for upper division work. Alumni are surveyed every three years to assess how well objectives are being achieved. Industry professionals are also surveyed periodically to analyze trends for curriculum development. **  

Comment:
Describe whether you are developing a plan, implementing a plan, evaluating data, or using data to affect the program.

Indicator 2.1.7
Describe how the program’s curriculum or teaching pedagogy has changed as a result of internal or external assessment. 
(200-word limit)

Outcomes assessment intensified in 1997 and has resulted in many changes in the curriculum, pedagogy, and learning assurance. With pedagogy, for example, the IME department uses a modified version of Bloom¿s Taxonomy and has specified the level of knowledge, skill, or ability targeted for each learning outcome in each course. Learning experiences are then aligned with the target outcome and assessed accordingly to provide a progressive learning experience. Significant examples of resulting changes in the curriculum are in the Senior Project and IME 415 Statistical Quality Control. At one point all that was required for senior project was a written report turned in any time. We now have a structured three-course sequence that requires a written report, formal presentation to the faculty and industry, two professional evaluations, and a reflective piece that assesses awareness of lifelong learning, social, global, and contemporary issues. In IME 415 a laboratory was added to improve student ability to understand and apply their knowledge, skills and abilities. Other important examples of changes include increases in teamwork experience, use of contemporary software, professional and ethical practice, impact on fiscal results, and increased analytical ability and development of mathematical models.*  

Comment:
You may include interactions with stakeholders, advisory boards, etc.


Criterion 2.2: Preparation of students for a diverse/global community 
Indicator 2.2.1
Describe courses/experiences related to global and/or diversity issues that are available to students.
(150-word limit)           

Global competition in manufacturing is brought to the attention of the students early in their curriculum through IME 112, MFE 201, 221 and 230. These courses include case studies of how the design and/or manufacturing of parts and components are made in different parts of the world. Product design and life cycle and its global environmental impact are also studied. IE 224 includes cases where culture, tradition, religion, etc. affects work standards. The global dimension is reinforced in Facilities Planning and Design (IME 331) and in Statistical Quality Control (IME 415) where cases of how quality standards affect supply chains are studied. Ethical Considerations in Technology (EGR 402) utilizes numerous cases with global context. The multinational nature and impact of research and development effort into advanced manufacturing systems are studied in MFE 476. Students are allowed to purse senior projects with international components. One example was the design of a production machine for a company in Tijuana.

Comment:
These could be on or off campus experiences international travel etc. 

Indicator 2.2.2
Diversity of the Faculty:

Male (Fall 05)
36.00 %

Female (Fall 05)
5.00 %

Black, non-Hispanic (Fall 05)
0.00 %

American Indian/Alaskan Native (Fall 05)
0.00 %

Asian/Pacific Islander (Fall 05)
5.00 %

Hispanic (Fall 05)
5.00 %

White, non-Hispanic (Fall 05)
31.00 %

Nonresident alien (Fall 05)
0.00 %

Race/ethnicity unknown (Fall 05)
0.00 %

Please describe policies and practices or current efforts to address the diversity of the faculty serving the program.
(150-word limit)

Efforts to expand diversity in the faculty of the IME department have been long, ongoing and continuing. The proof is the current diversity of the program which is expressed in different countries of origin, ethnicity and gender. Currently we have seven permanent full-time faculty and one FERP. The faculty consists of two US born Caucasian males, three Asian males (Iran, India, and Afghanistan), one Asian female (Iran), one German born Caucasian male, and one Mexican born Hispanic male. Thus, there is significant non-Caucasian male representation in our faculty. In addition, the two most recent hires have been female and Hispanic, indicating the intent to expand faculty diversity in the department. *  


Criterion 2.3: Faculty research and creative activity

Indicator 2.3.1
List faculty peer reviewed publications and creative activities: (Years 03-04, 04-05, 05-06)

Department wide

Okhuysen, V. F, ¿A Practical Assessment of Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites¿, CPP Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies¿, Fall 2003

Okhuysen, V. F., ¿Dimensional and Control of Investment Castings¿, 51st Technical Conference, Investment Casting Institute, October 2003.

Bauch, K. D., Laboratory Manual and Workbook Assignments for MFE 310/L Advanced Computer Drafting , 2004

Sadat, A. B., ¿The Effect of Tool Cutting Edge Geometry on the Quality of Machined Surface in Micro Turning Operation¿ accepted for presentation and publication at the International Conference on Production Research Americas¿04, Santiago, Chile, Aug. 1st ¿4th, 2004.

Okhuysen, V. F., ¿Investment Casting Shell Mold Drying Model¿, American Foundry Society Transaction, 2004.

Okhuysen, V. and Hutchinson, N., ¿Effects of Acoustic Stimulation on Molten Aluminum¿, Cal Poly Pomona Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, Fall 2004.

Sadat, A. B., ¿The Effect of Tool Cutting Edge Geometry on the Quality of Machined Surface in Micro Turning Operation,¿ Proceedings of IDETC/CIE, ASME 2005 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences & Computers and Information in Engineering Conferences, Long Beach, CA Sept. 24-28, 2005

Harrell, C., Ghosh, B.K., and Bowden, R,. Introduction to Simulation Using ProModel, 4th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2004.

Rosenkrantz, P. R., ¿The Customer-Supplier Link in Engineering Education,¿ Proceedings, ASEE Conference, PSW Regional Meeting, April 7-8, 2005, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles.

Rosenkrantz, P. R., ¿A Demonstration and Critique of Tools and Techniques Used for Teaching a Hybrid On-Line Engineering Economics Course¿, Proceedings, ASEE Conference, PSW Regional Meeting, April 20-21, 2006, Cal Poly Pomona University, Los Angeles.

Rebecca Leopard, Mariappan Jawaharlal, Kamran Abedini, ¿Statics Visualization Kit¿, Proceedings, ASEE Conference, PSW Regional Meeting, April 20-21, 2006, Cal Poly Pomona University, Los Angeles.

*

Comment:
This information should be available in the annual report.

Indicator 2.3.2
Describe any resources available for professional travel excluding resources made available by the College Dean, Faculty Center, Research and Graduate Studies, or President’s travel funds. (Years 03-04, 04-05, 05-06)
(150-word limit)

The department has received funds from the Foundry Education Foundation to allow faculty and student travel to conferences for $3000/yr. Local professional societies provide minor support ($500/yr) to facilitate student travel as well.**  

Indicator 2.3.3
Describe policies, practices and resources for encouraging professional, scholarly and creative activities.
(150-word limit) 

Faculty and students are encouraged and are provided funds to publish and present papers, accompany students to national competitions, or attend meetings as officers of national organizations. This has become routine in nature with continued annual participation at WESTEC, IIE Regional and National Conferences, NAMRC, and ASEE Regional and National Conferences. Twice each year the student leaders and faculty advisors of all student organizations (called the Executive Council of Professional Societies) meet to plan for these events and schedule department sponsored events to make sure there are no conflicts. In 2006 Dr. Sima Parisay coordinated the hosting of the ASEE Pacific Southwest Conference at Cal Poly Pomona. IE students have won first place and two second places in the international paper competition in three of the last four years. The student chapter of IIE has won the highest chapter award possible (Gold Award) the past five years. *  


Criterion 2.4: Quality of student advising       

Indicator 2.4.1
Describe policies and practices for academic advising within the program.                      
(150-word limit)

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor for their complete term at Cal Poly Pomona. This practice is followed to assure consistency and allow the student and advisor to build and maintain a relationship. Students are encouraged to visit their academic advisor not only for advice and direction in the program, but also for assistance in maintaining their academic success. An advising hold is placed on each student before registration opens each quarter. In order to remove the hold and continue with registration, the student must meet with their advisor and complete a blue course list and advising form. The meeting is used to review the student's academic progress, discuss the allocation of student time between academic, personal, and employment requirements, and to determine a program of study for the coming quarter. When all of these are accomplished, the blue course list and advising form is submitted to the department office, the hold is removed, and the student proceeds with registration. This process is monitored by the Department Chair who reinforces the process at department meetings. *

Indicator 2.4.2
Graduation rates: by gender and ethnicity:

Values for indicator 2.4.2, graduation rates by gender and ethnicity, are empty for all programs. Graduation rates for first-time freshmen and transfer students are provided for undergraduate programs only. These data were omitted from the reports because it was not feasible to assemble them from existing systems at this time, due primarily to conversion/cross-over issues between Banner and PeopleSoft.

First time freshman 6-year graduation rate

0.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Ethnicity

Black, non-Hispanic (empty) %
American Indian/Alaskan Native (empty) %
Asian/Pacific Islander (empty) %
Hispanic (empty) %
White, non-Hispanic (empty) %
Nonresident alien (empty) %
Race/ethnicity unknown (empty) %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Transfer Student 3-year graduation rate

25.00 %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Ethnicity

Black, non-Hispanic (empty) %
American Indian/Alaskan Native (empty) %
Asian/Pacific Islander (empty) %
Hispanic (empty) %
White, non-Hispanic (empty) %
Nonresident alien (empty) %
Race/ethnicity unknown (empty) %

(Value provided by the Administration)

Indicator 2.4.3
Number and percentage of Students “At Risk”:

Fall 00 Fall 01 Fall 02 Fall 03 Fall 05
9.00 18.00% 11.00 19.64% 18.00 29.51% 26.00 44.07%   23.00 30.67%

(Value provided by the Administration)

Describe any policies or procedures related specifically to at-risk students (150-word limit)

The at-risk student has a GPA < 2.2. The student is required, through an academic hold, to meet with their academic advisor. Together they diagnose the reasons for the lack of academic progress and plan a course of action to return to satisfactory academic standing. Discussion topics include: employment/school time management, lack of progress; study habits, and lack of preparedness. The advisor may urge the student to take advantage of other campus resources. Finally, a formal contract is drawn up indicating courses to be taken and the grade point deficiency to be made up by each course. The contract is agreed to, signed, and placed on file. The contract becomes the focal point of further meetings between the student and advisor. This process is monitored by the Department Chair who reinforces the process at department meetings. Students who are struggling with study habit issues may be directed to the department website: "How to Study Math, Science, Engineering, and Other Stuff" for assistance *  

Comment:
Below 2.2 Cal Poly Pomona GPA for undergraduates and below 3.0 GPA for graduates

Indicator 2.4.4
Number of degrees granted:

00 01 02 03 05
11.00 11.00 5.00 11.00 8.00

(Value provided by the Administration)

Indicator 2.4.5
Describe current opportunities for students to apply knowledge in the program through; internships, summer programs, research opportunities, co-op, part-time jobs relating to university course work, teaching associates, etc. (150-word limit)

By design the MFE courses are enriched with desired outcomes and objectives that provide skills and competencies employers seek in prospective students for either part-time jobs, internships, or coops. For example MFE 126 teaches the necessary skills expected in the practice of drafting. In MFE 221 and MFE 230 students have the opportunity to have hands on experience with casting, machining forming, welding and other processes. Students learn marketable skills. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the formal internship program offered by the university as well as the less formal summer internships offered by industry. Employers offering part time jobs, internships, and coops are encouraged to provide flyers about open positions that are posted in the department and sent to students via email. Often these contacts lead to permanent professional positions. On occasion, a faculty member will recruit a student to assist in developing a laboratory. This may take the form of setting up pieces of equipment and perhaps acting as a teaching assistant. This practice has also led to research and the publishing of papers authored by a faculty member and student. *  

Indicator 2.4.6
Describe current structures/processes provided by the program to facilitate student job placement. (150-word limit)

In addition to career center resources, the IME Department has a number of structures and processes that facilitate job placement. When the department is notified that companies are recruiting on campus, this information is brought to the attention of students and they are urged to attend. Recruiters are also invited to attend the meetings of the student professional organizations. Job postings submitted by employers are posted and sometimes also emailed to students. These sources provide mutual contact for future employment. The departmental Industry Advisory Council is a rich source of job placement for students. Many IAC members have met and hired students by attending student club meetings or senior project presentations. The professional organizations such as, IIE, SME, ASQ and others provide excellent contact for student job placement. These organizations provide opportunity for students to attend senior level meetings at which the students meet and become familiar with members who are active in their disciplines.*  


Criterion 2.5: Contribution to the sense of community and the intellectual quality of the campus

Indicator 2.5.1
Describe the current co-curricular and extra activities for students supported by the program (i.e.: clubs, social events, performances.)
(150-word limit)

The IME Department has a number of structures and processes to facilitate student job placement. When the department is notified that companies are recruiting on campus, this information is brought to the attention of students and they are urged to attend. Recruiters are also invited to attend the meetings of the student professional organizations. Job postings submitted by employers are posted and sometimes also emailed to students. These sources provide mutual contact for future employment. The departmental Industry Advisory Council is a rich source of job placement for students. Many IAC members have met and hired students by attending student club meetings or senior project presentations. The professional organizations such as, IIE, SME, ASQ and others provide excellent contact for student job placement. These organizations provide opportunity for students to attend senior level meetings at which the students meet and become familiar with members who are active in their disciplines.**

Indicator 2.5.2
List speakers, symposia, workshops, etc. provided by the program over the past year. 

Guest speakers for classes and professional society meetings over the last year include: 1- Kaz Takeda, IE Manager, Disneyland; 2- Dan Gonzalez, IE Manager, Biosense Webster; 3 ¿Henry Chacon, Facilities Management, Boeing, 4- IIE Orange County Chapter Lean Manufacturing Symposia, 5- Larry Phelan, Quality Manager, Beckman-Coulter; 6 ¿ Janet Hanna, Kim Kinda, Project Managers, Disneyland; 7 ¿ Michelle Wostenberg, Manager; Nortel. IME Department sponsored conferences and workshops include the ASEE Regional Conference (Dr. Sima Parisay, Program Chair);  


3 CRITERIA DIMENSION THREE
(Efficiency)

Criterion 3.1: Utilization of physical space            

Indicator 3.1.1
Describe the general space needs of the program and current utilization of space excluding temporary relocations:
(200-word limit each field)
                                                                                                                   
Instructional Space (Classrooms/Labs)

Instructional Space

The IME department supervises and uses the following classrooms/laboratories in Building 17 for the MFE program. In addition to use by the department, available time is shared with other departments in the College of Engineering. Lecture space is also shared with other colleges. This practice is not unusual.

17-2640 Operations Research and Design (shared)
17-2626 Human Engineering
17-2654 Graphics and Spatial Visualization (shared)
17-1540 Manufacturing Processes (shared)
17-1536 Welding (shared)
17-1623 Classroom (shared)
17-1659 Computer Integrated Manufacturing
13 - Foundry, Plastics Lab

Several other classrooms and laboratories in Buildings 9 and 17 are shared with other engineering programs on a space available basis.

17-2660
17-1631
9-251
9-303
9-305
9-429

The above classroom and laboratory/workshop spaces are sufficient for the current size of the department, and the current frequency of scheduling of classes.
 

Non-instructional Space

The large amount of laboratories in our curriculum requires that we have extensive storage space dedicated to raw materials and tooling. In addition, the preparation of this material for the laboratories also requires specialized equipment (such as heavy duty shears) that also occupy a significant amount of space. The department technicians in the IME Department and across campus also use this equipment, especially to repair and maintain laboratories. Finally, campus facilities personnel also use some of this specialized equipment to support their own functions (e.g., shearing large pieces of material).  

Comment:
The PRPC is interested in understanding the approximate amount of space that is currently used to run the program.  Are the spaces shared spaces that may be used by other programs throughout the day, week or quarter.  Does the program utilize dedicated space that is used by the program exclusively by one program or class and is not open to other programs due to scheduling, unique equipment or security requirements? Do programs share non-instructional spaces? Do tenure/tenure track faculty members share office space?


Criterion 3.2: Utilization of human resources           

Indicator 3.2.1
Percent of total FTE taught by full-time vs. part-time faculty:

Percent of total undergraduate FTES by part-time (Fall 05)
(empty) %

Percent of total graduate FTES by part-time (Fall 05)
(empty) %

Percent of total undergraduate FTES by full-time (Fall 05)
(empty) %

Percent of total graduate FTES by full-time (Fall 05)
(empty) %

Comment:
The PRPC is interested in looking at how much of an individual program’s curriculum is being taught by full-time and part-time faculty.  The committee does not have a bias about whether a high ratio of one or the other is preferred or if a balance is ideal.  The intent of the ratio is to provide a context within which the committee can make comparisons.

(Optional) If appropriate, comment on the average FTE taught. 100-word limit

Because of facilities limitations and safety considerations, many laboratory sections have class sizes that can be as small as 16 students. These limitations reduce the average FTE taught. The department compensates when possible by using large lectures with multiple lab sections.**  

Indicator 3.2.2
List the number and nature of administrative support staff dedicated to the program.

Number: 0.41
Nature: (empty)

Comment:
The PRPC recognizes that the number of administrative staff is not necessarily established by a program, nor is the number of support staff necessarily an indicator of the quality of a program.  The committee is interested in looking at the number of staff (i.e. Administrative Coordinator) that may be directly assigned to a program.  If a staff person is shared between programs estimate the amount or ratio as a percentage of the assignment of the staff person to the program based on FTES. 

Indicator 3.2.3
Number of technical and instructional support staff.
0.82

Comment:
The PRPC recognizes that technical and instructional staff members are often shared between programs within a department or a college. Estimate the amount or ratio as a percentage of the assignment of the staff person to the program based on FTES in the individual programs supported. 

(Optional) If appropriate, comment on the administrative structure of your staff. 100-word limit

Technical staff is shared in the College of Engineering. While two full time technicians are assigned to the department, in reality all the technicians in the college act as a team working together when job size or expertise warrant. This is a very good arrangement. We have one office administrative assistant who handles the needs of three degree programs. Administrative assistants in Bldg 17 work together to cover vacations, etc.  


Criterion 3.3: Utilization of technology           

Indicator 3.3.1
Describe the use of computer technology to enhance course delivery and/or course administration.(150-word limit)

EGR 403 Asset Allocation in Technical Decision Making is taken my many engineering majors. It is delivered as a face-to-face course and as a hybrid course. The hybrid course was developed during the COLT program and uses streaming audio with PowerPoint to deliver course content. Student team projects use web assisted technology in WebCT. IME 415, IE 419, and IME 301 also use Blackboard for course management. Video clips made with Camtasia Studio and uploaded to WebCT or Blackboard are used to supplement EGR 403 and IME 301. MFE 126, 217, 221 and 230 have also been enhanced by the use of blackboard tools--specifically access to lecture notes, homework solutions, study guides and other course related information. A DOCLE project proposal was submitted, but not funded. One faculty member did attend the DOLCE training in June 2006.  

Comment:
The PRPC is interested in how technology is being utilized by the program.  This use includes regular in-class presentation technologies and course administration (i.e. Blackboard, WebCT, or similar) as well as on-line materials and communications. 


Criterion 3.4: Utilization of time 

Indicator 3.4.1
Describe the current use of alternative scheduling (i.e. evenings, weekends, school breaks and summer) to facilitate or improve student academic progress. (150-word limit)

Classes are randomly scheduled so that at times they are also offered in evenings, afternoons and mornings. Wherever possible lectures are scheduled opposite laboratories in similar time modules to facilitate student scheduling. Department policy and practice is to make sure that upper-division courses do not overlap and lower-division courses do not overlap. This forces courses to be as spread out as possible during the week. While we like to honor faculty wishes for course scheduling, one of the realities of a small department is that user-friendly scheduling has a high priority.**  


Criterion 3.5: Management of financial resources   

Indicator 3.5.1
Program teaching cost: (Year 05-06)

Cost per WTU
$ (empty)

Cost per FTES
$ (empty)

Comment:
The PRPC recognizes that this cost changes over time depending on the number of students and the faculty members teaching in the program.  There is no target value rather the value serves as context.

Indicator 3.5.2
Current total operating expenditures: (Year 05-06)
$ 367,334.00

Indicator 3.5.3
External funding generated: (Year, 04-05)

Cash Gifts
$ (empty)

Gifts in Kind
$ (empty)

Annual Fund
$ (empty)

Comment:
The PRPC is interested in understanding how well supported a program may be by ongoing fundraising efforts at the program, College or University levels. 

Indicator 3.5.4
Other revenues generated by the program per Serialized Tenured and Tenure Track faculty.

Grant and Contract Activity

02-03 03-04 04-05
$ (empty) $ (empty) $ (empty)

Indirect Cost Recovery for Fiscal Year

02-03 03-04 04-05
$ (empty) $ (empty) $ (empty)

Open University

03-04 04-05 05-06
$ (empty) $ (empty) $ (empty)

Comment:
Include in this area research grants that sponsor research activities and or release time.  Also include sponsored classes and revenue generated through continuing education or Open University classes that is reimbursed to the program.

(Optional) If appropriate, comment on the resource indicators above.
(150-word limit)

The IME Department has two alumni mailings each year to encourage alumni attendance at department events and also solicit donations to our scholarship fund. This was a result of our revised advancement plan implemented in 2002. At our May 2005 and May 2006 we gave out over $18,000 total in donated scholarship money to 25-30 students.  


4 CRITERIA DIMENSION FOUR
(Opportunity Analysis of the Program)

Criterion 4.1: Opportunities for growth or enhancement in meeting the University Mission

Indicator 4.1.1
Describe how and in priority order areas you would change your program to greater enhance or facilitate the University Mission if your program’s resources were increased permanently.

  • Faculty
  • Staff
  • Equipment
  • Recruiting
  • Operating Budget
  • Facilities
  • Other

(300-word limit)

The IME Department is in recovery from the 42% reduction in full-time faculty over the past 6 years caused by retirements that were not replaced due to budget cuts. During the same time the number of MFE majors has held steady or grown and the demand for service courses has increased. In addition, oversight of the MSEM program has been handed down to the department with no assistance provided. One faculty member, for example, is responsible for maintaining and upgrading five laboratories while dealing with a teaching overload and larger class sizes; lastly, all faculty are teaching over 14 WTU¿s with increased class sizes and increased service loads. As the department faculty members are committed to the University¿s mission, we want to continue our successful record of graduating outstanding engineers from often underprepared and underrepresented students in a learn by doing environment without compromising access.
The solution proposed by the faculty is as follows: Hire two new tenure-track MFE faculty with specialties in Biomedical, Composites, Computer Numerical Control, Systems Engineering, and Automation. The IME Faculty has collectively identified the following improvement goals: Curriculum updates reflecting latest technology (e.g., rapid prototyping); instruct the increasing student population effectively by reducing class sizes and using educational technology more effectively; enhance management and development of laboratories (e.g., grant proposals, laboratory enhancement, equipment acquisition) ; improve support to master¿s program. All of these goals are attainable only with new full-time faculty to assist and be part of the restoration. The overall IME Department Recovery plan calls for searching for two full-time tenured faculty members during the 2006-2007 AY: One MFE faculty and one IE/MSEM faculty. That would be followed by searching for one MFE faculty member in 2007-2008 and one IE faculty member in 2008-2009. **
 

Comment:
For each program, briefly describe what you would do if you had a permanent increase in state funding and why. For example, it could be that hiring more serialized faculty is the most pressing need to meet and sustain the demands of growth and insure student success. Perhaps new laboratory equipment and lab assistance is needed to replace outdated equipment, maintain quality and keep the curriculum relevant. Faculty travel, release time for a vital department need, or any other use of funds could be part of your proposal.